Self-Development – Independent Learning

SELF-DEVELOPMENT – INDEPENDENT LEARNING
Have you ever started to work in a Dolphinarium and seen others busy moving around doing different tasks and you don’t have any idea of what you should or could be doing?
How many times have wanted to learn or be given the opportunity to work hands on with the animals, but because of your lack experience you have been placed at the back of the line, waiting for your time to come?
When new staff start working in a Dolphinarium they must wait until management decides who they choose to work directly with the animals…and you could just be waiting and waiting.
What if I tell you, you can learn everything you need to know, even before you step into a Dolphinarium!
Imagine going straight in with the confidence and understanding, getting familiar with everything you need to know, including the training jargon trainers use to communicate with each other.
You don’t have to wait until someone teaches you the basics of what trainers are doing at any given time, or know what they need to do next.
Now you don’t have to wait or risk limited training you may access anywhere else.
With our self-educating courses, you can be a step ahead and be able to develop to your fullest potential.
You now can learn step by step what they may not teach you on the job or on the internet… the secrets, tricks and different techniques of marine mammal training.
For more information contact

viadolphin@hotmail.co.uk

 

Scientists Record Conversations of Mysterious Dolphin

The rare Araguaian river dolphin is a mysterious creature native to Brazil which researchers have long thought to be solitary. Because of this assumption, it was believed that the animals would not be capable of complex communication, given that their social structure does not require it.

But now scientists from the University of Vermont have discovered that the dolphins do interact with one another and can make hundreds of different sounds for the purposes of communication, according to a study published in the journal PeerJ.

 

amr

“We found that they do interact socially and are making more sounds than previously thought,” Laura May Collado, a biologist at the University of Vermont, said in a statement. “Their vocal repertoire is very diverse.”

Little is known about the Araguaian dolphins, also known as botos, because they are hard to find—as well as being difficult to approach—thus studies about them are limited. They only live in the waters of the Araguaia and Tocatins rivers and their numbers likely do not exceed more than one and a half thousand in total.

Fortunately, the research team was able to find a fish market in the town of Mocajuba where the dolphins often visit because people give them food.

Here, the team used underwater cameras and microphones to record the sounds and interactions between the dolphins at the market. In addition, they also took some DNA samples from the animals.

Gallery: The Most Fascinating Facts About Dolphins (Redbook)

Overall, they captured around 20 hours of recordings, identifying 237 different types of sounds. But even with nearly an entire day of material, the team speculate that the dolphins can produce more sounds than they recorded. Many of the sounds were short, two-part calls, which baby dolphins made when approaching their mothers.

“It’s exciting; marine dolphins like the bottlenose use signature whistles for contact, and here we have a different sound used by river dolphins for the same purpose,” Collado said.

amazr

The scientists also recorded the dolphins making longer calls and whistles, but these were not so frequent, and it is currently unclear what their purpose is. In bottlenose dolphin communication, longer whistles are used to boost group cohesion. But the researchers think the botos may use them for the opposite reason—to maintain distance.

The team say that the frequency of the river dolphin calls were somewhere between the low-frequency sounds made by baleen whales to communicate over long distances and the high-frequency calls used by marine dolphins over short distances. Collado suggests that the acoustic characteristics of their calls were likely influenced by the river environment that they live in.

“There are a lot of obstacles like flooded forests and vegetation in their habitat, so this signal could have evolved to avoid echoes from vegetation and improve the communication range of mothers and their calves,” she said.

The Araguaian dolphins were only identified as a distinct species in 2014, differentiating them from their close relatives—the Bolivian river dolphin and the Amazon river dolphin. While the classification of Araguaian botos is still up for debate, Collado notes that calls between the species show significant differences—Ecuadorean Amazon river dolphins are very quiet, for example.

“We need more information on these other species and more populations,” she said. “Why is one population chattier than others and how do these differences shape their social structure?”

Reported by newsweek

A Trainers love lasts forever

When 10 years has passed and you see with your own eyes, the proof of a unique bond between an animal and a human.

I was so flabbergasted it took my breath away and brought tears to my eyes.

Misty… the closest animal to me and the smarted dolphin I have ever trained, proved to me once again, what a special bond we had after 10 years without interacting with each other.

When I remember how we found her its breaks my heart!

She was just a baby, floating lifeless, like a piece of drift-wood in the open ocean, alone and close to dying, when we came to her rescue.

It was April the 4th 2005, she was a very sick, cast away from her family, very dehydrated body, with severe infections plus around six ulcers in her stomach, which I later observed through our endoscope camera.

After nursing her back to health, she soon became the most intelligent and responsive animal and after sleeping many nights by her side on the trainer’s platform, we developed a bond that was evident in her reaction to me, whenever we were together.

Fast forward now to two weeks ago, on a visit to see all my friends at Dolphin Cove Jamaica Ocho Rios, my one thought was how was Misty. She was 16 years old whilst I was there, so I wanted to see my young friend!  I was asked if I wanted to help feed her and naturally, with such a kind offer from the trainers who by now had heard of our history, I could not miss the chance to see Misty.

I gave her a tactile signal, which I used to give her always when we used to play, only she and I knew about it, it was our little secret… I was speechless when she responded positive and with fluency to my signal after 10 years…my heart was bursting with happiness, after she showed me that she remembered my unique signal and touch. I spent a short while with her and could tell by other unique signals and touches that she remembered each one perfectly.

It was an amazing experience and confirms my belief that not only are these beautiful animals so intelligent, but that a special bond can exist between a trainer with an honest kind heart, putting their love into how they treat their animal and an animal respecting that treatment. Often, Misty offered to perform without constant positive reinforcement, because she trusted me to reward fully at the end of the program, this was also somewhat unique to Misty and I, but it also demonstrates what can happen, if you treat the animals with love and respect.

A big thank you to you guys at Ocho Rios for making this experience possible, it will remain in my heart, as will Misty, forever.

 

The fossil of a 43-million-year-old whale with four legs, webbed feet and hooves has been discovered in Peru.

Palaeontologists believe the marine mammal’s four-metre-long (13 ft) body was adapted to swim and walk on land.

With four limbs capable of carrying its weight and a powerful tail, the semi-aquatic whale has been compared to an otter or a beaver.

Researchers believe the discovery could shed light on the evolution of the whale and how it spread.

“This is the most complete specimen ever found for a four-legged whale outside of India and Pakistan,” Dr Olivier Lambert, a scientist at the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences and co-author of the study, said.

It was found in marine sediments 1km (0.6 miles) inland from Peru’s Pacific coast, at Playa Media Luna.

The location has piqued researchers’ interest as the first whales are thought to have first evolved in South Asia around 50 million years ago.

As their bodies became better suited to water, they migrated further afield to North Africa and North America, where fossils have been found.

The latest discovery suggests early whales managed to swim there from South America.

“Whales are this iconic example of evolution,” Travis Park, an ancient whale researcher at the Natural History Museum in London, said.

“They went from small hoofed mammals to the blue whale we have today. It’s so interesting to see how they conquered the oceans.”

An international team of palaeontologists from Peru, France, Italy, the Netherlands, and Belgium excavated the fossil in 2011.

They have named it Peregocetus pacificus, meaning “the travelling whale that reached the Pacific”.

BBC News

 

 

New Experience Opportunity

 

Marine Internships – Work With Dolphins in Zanzibar

AdCollect Conservation Data on Dolphins & Other Marine Life. Enquire Today & Discover Tropical.

 

Zanzibar, off the coast of Tanzania, is a beautiful tropical island and tourist hot-spot due to its stunning beaches, turquoise waters and vibrant history. Ticking swimming with dolphins off the bucket list is also why many venture to this exotic paradise. Yet, prominent research shows the harmful effects of mismanaged interactions and this form of tourism on marine mammals. The answer is never simple – considering the local community’s reliance on this income – but, as part of this Marine Eco Tourism Internship abroad you will become part of a positive solution.

Throughout your placement, you’ll help to create responsible ecotourism practices, connecting a passion for nature, conservation and entrepreneurship with high calibre data collection for university-led research studies.

THIS MARINE ECO-TOURISM INTERNSHIP, YOU WILL:

  • Work with tourism operators in the area to determine the impact of current practices on the marine biodiversity in the area and assess the long-term benefit of sustainable ecotourism
  • By boat, collect daily data on dolphins and other marine life, including the significant influence of tourism on their natural behavior
  • Build on local capacity by delivering collaborative workshops that encourage the community of tourism boat drivers to create more sustainable practices
  • Assist in delivering a change to tourism practices in the private sector, developing small enterprises and high-quality programs to ensure the longevity – and conservation – of the ocean’s natural resources
  • Attend monthly meetings with our research partners from the Institute of Marine Sciences (University of Dar es Salaam) to discuss project development, research studies and alignment
  • Live and work on one of the most stunning tropical islands in the world
  • Be immersed in the vibrant and colorful fishing villages of Jambiani and Kizimkazi
  • Be supported throughout by our team of 3 personal mentors, giving you context and tools to use throughout your future career

 

https://www.africanimpact.com

 

Educational-California sea lions

Every four to five years, The Marine Mammal Center sees a surge in the number of California sea lions that are admitted with symptoms of leptospirosis, a bacterial infection that affects the kidneys and can be lethal. If not treated, the bacteria can cause irreversible kidney damage.

The Marine Mammal Center is currently responding to the second largest leptospirosis outbreak on record in California sea lions. Read more about the current outbreak. For media inquiries, please email media@tmmc.org.

Leptospirosis is caused by a spiral-shaped bacteria called Leptospira. Veterinarians can usually identify leptospirosis in a patient even before laboratory tests confirm a diagnosis because of the infection’s distinctive symptoms in California sea lions, which include drinking water and folding the flippers over the abdomen.

Marine mammals generally do not need to drink water because they receive all the hydration they need from food sources. But when they are infected with the Leptospira , their kidneys stop functioning properly and cannot filter toxins or regulate hydration.

Sea lions diagnosed with leptospirosis are treated with antibiotics, fluids and other supportive care, such as gastroprotectants for stomach and intestinal ulcers. Unfortunately, even with treatment, roughly two-thirds of the animals that strand with acute leptospirosis do not survive.

However, research using data and samples collected at The Marine Mammal Center, as well as data collected from sea lions in the wild, indicate that many sea lions infected with Leptospira survive and likely experience mild or no symptoms of the disease, unlike the acute cases seen at our hospital.

Leptospirosis is a major health burden for humans, domestic animals and wildlife worldwide with over 500,000 severe cases in humans every year. Leptospira can cause disease ranging from infection with no symptoms to severe and possibly fatal disease.

The type of Leptospira affecting California sea lions at The Marine Mammal Center is a strain that has also been associated with pigs, skunks and foxes. It’s transmitted via urine, either directly or via contaminated water or soil.

Researchers haven’t definitively determined how transmission occurs within the sea lion population, but they believe it occurs primarily while sea lions are hauled out on land. The bacteria may also survive for short periods in seawater, so transmission may be possible when large groups of sea lions gather in the water.

When a leptospirosis outbreak occurs, our scientists study the disease to learn more about what causes an outbreak and how we can improve treatment for infected animals. Thanks to the Center’s 43 years of stranding records and bank of blood and urine samples, researchers have a unique opportunity to investigate the disease patterns over four decades.

The graph above shows the seasonal nature of these outbreaks, reflected in large numbers of California sea lions stranding and being treated at the Center for clinical signs of kidney failure. © The Marine Mammal Center
For over 10 years, scientists at The Marine Mammal Center have collaborated with researchers at the Lloyd-Smith Laboratory in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at UCLA to study the dynamics of this pathogen in the California sea lion population. The Center has been on the forefront of research on leptospirosis in marine mammals and has published a number of scientific papers on the disease dating back to 1985.

Leptospira was first detected in California sea lions in 1970 during a leptospirosis outbreak that occurred along the coast of California, Oregon and Washington. And since the 1980s we have seen yearly, seasonal outbreaks with major outbreak events causing 100 or more sea lion strandings happening every four to five years.

The reasons for these periodic major outbreaks in sea lions is unknown, however our UCLA collaborators believe that a combination of factors may be responsible, such as changes in herd immunity, sea surface temperatures and sea lion migration patterns.

Interestingly, after 30 uninterrupted years of seeing at least a few cases of leptospirosis annually, the disease disappeared from the population in late 2013 only to reappear four years later. Researchers at UCLA believe the disappearance of the disease may be related to the highly anomalous oceanographic conditions that occurred during the same time period. The abnormally warm waters, commonly referred to as “the Blob,” may have caused changes in sea lion behavior and migration patterns as they struggled to find food sources.

Since 2009, the Center’s biologists and veterinary staff have taken blood and urine samples from wild juvenile California sea lions at popular haul-out spots in the San Francisco and Monterey Bay areas. These animals are then tagged and released, and the urine and blood samples help researchers learn more about kidney function and exposure rates among these animals.

This collaborative research project also relies on long-term demographic datasets generated by our partners at the NOAA Fisheries Marine Mammal Laboratory. These biologists monitor and track pups born on the Channel Islands every year. We also work closely with biologists in Oregon and Washington who monitor the sea lions in those areas.

Many different animal species, including humans and dogs, can become infected with Leptospira through contact with contaminated urine, water or soil. The Marine Mammal Center has a number of safety protocols in place to prevent transmission to veterinarians and volunteers working with our sea lion patients.

 

 

Source: https://viadolphin.com/research-information/

 

Endocrine disruptions found in bottle nose dolphins

Bottlenose dolphins are being exposed to chemical compounds added to many common cleaning products, cosmetics, personal care products and plastics, according to a new study in GeoHealth, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

The new research found evidence of exposure to these chemical compounds, called phthalates, in 71 percent of dolphins tested in Sarasota Bay, Florida during 2016 and 2017. Previous studies detected phthalate metabolites in the blubber or skin of a few individual marine mammals, but the new study is the first to document the additives in the urine of wild marine mammals.

Some phthalates have been linked to hormonal, metabolic and reproductive problems in humans, including low sperm count and abnormal development of reproductive organs. The study’s authors do not know what health impacts phthalate compounds may have on dolphins, but the presence of byproducts of the chemicals in the animals’ urine indicates they have remained in the body long enough to process them.

“We focused on urine in dolphins because, in previous studies of humans, that has been the most reliable matrix to indicate short-term exposure.” said Leslie Hart, a public health professor at the College of Charleston and the lead author of the new study.

Studies have linked human exposure to phthalates with use of products containing these additives, such as personal care products and cosmetics, but Hart said the source of dolphin exposure to phthalates is not yet known. Elevated concentrations in dolphin urine of a specific phthalate compound most commonly added to plastics hinted at plastic waste as a possible source of exposure for the dolphins, she said.

“These chemicals can enter marine waters from urban runoff and agricultural or industrial emissions, but we also know that there is a lot of plastic pollution in the environment” said Hart.

Understanding exposure in dolphins gives scientists insight into the contaminants in local waters and what other animals, including humans, are being exposed to, according to the study’s authors.

Gina Ylitalo, an analytical chemist at NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center who was not involved in the study, said dolphins are good indicators of what is going on in coastal waters.

“Any animals in the near shore environment with similar prey are probably being exposed as well,” she said. “The dolphins are great sentinels of the marine environment.”

Ubiquitous contaminants

Phthalate compounds are added to a wide variety of products to confer flexibility, durability, and lubrication. Some phthalates interfere with body systems designed to receive messages from hormones such as estrogen and testosterone. This can disrupt natural responses to these hormone signals.

Tests for phthalate exposure look for metabolites of the compounds, the products of initial breakdown of the compounds by the liver.

“We are looking for metabolites. These are indicators that the dolphins have been exposed somewhere in their environment and that the body has started to process them,” Hart said.

About 160 dolphins live in Sarasota Bay, a subtropical coastal lagoon tucked between barrier islands and the cities of Sarasota and Bradenton on the southwest coast of Florida. The Chicago Zoological Society’s Sarasota Dolphin Research Program has tracked individual dolphins since 1970, monitoring their health, behavior, and exposure to contaminants. The dolphins are residents of the area year-round, across multiple decades, with individuals living up to 67 years.

In 2016 and 2017, Hart and her colleagues tested the urine of 17 wild dolphins in and around Sarasota Bay for nine phthalates. They found phthalate metabolites in the urine of 71 percent of the dolphins tested.

Hart compared the dolphin data to human data from the CDC’s National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), which includes information about behavior and diet as well as blood and urine samples from a large cross section of the U.S. population. She found concentrations of one type of phthalate metabolite, monoethyl phthalate (MEP), were much lower in dolphins than in the human population surveyed by NHANES, but concentrations of another type of phthalate metabolite, mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), were equivalent or higher to the levels found in humans.

“If you look at the primary uses of the parent compounds, MEP’s parent is commonly used in cosmetics and personal care products including shampoos and body wash, whereas MEHP is a metabolite of a compound commonly added to plastic,” Hart said.

Indicator species

Understanding what dolphins are exposed to gives researchers and the public a better idea of what is in the environment.

The study is particularly valuable because of the long-term data available on the Sarasota dolphins’ health and behavior, said Ylitalo. Bottlenose dolphins are good indicators of pollutant exposure in whales and dolphins that can’t be easily sampled.

“We will not be getting urine samples from killer whales in my neck of the woods,” Ylitalo said. “They don’t know what the health effects are yet, but if any group can do it, it will be these type of folks who start teasing it out.”

Documenting exposure was an important first step, Hart said. She wants to expand the sample size to continue investigating the extent and potential health impacts of exposure and start tracking down possible sources. Ultimately, she hopes this research could be used to help curtail the sources of contamination.

“We’ve introduced these chemicals, they are not natural toxins, and we have the ability to reverse it, to clean this up.” Hart said.

 

source

www.sciencedaily.com

Job Hunt

Marine Mammal & Sea Turtle Rescue Intern (Winter 2018/2019)

Time commitment: THREE Full Days Per Week (8:00am – 6:00pm)

Marine Animal Rescue responds to calls to provide medical treatment for whales, dolphins, porpoises, seals and sea turtles.  Established in 1968, the Marine Animal Rescue Team has responded to thousands of calls providing medical treatment to stranded, injured and diseased marine animals throughout the New England coastal region.  Interns provide support for Rescue staff in all aspects of the program.

 

Responsibilities: 

  • A significant amount of cleaning is required in order to maintain the hospital environment
  • Follow standard quarantine protocols
  • Food preparation and feeding of animals
  • Restraining animals for treatments and injections
  • Monitoring behavior and health of animals
  • Maintaining records including water quality, daily food intake, swim charts and treatment sheets
  • Interns may have the opportunity to assist with necropsies and help with animals in the field


Qualifications: 

  • Previous animal handling experience
  • Must be in good physical condition and able to lift 50 pounds
  • Must be able to perform significant cleaning tasks daily
  • Must be able to work independently and as part of a team
  • Must be at least 18 years of age and have access to a car

Note: This internship is extremely competitive; pay close attention in addressing all of the position requirements and qualifications in your cover letter. This position is not available for January term.

*PLEASE NOTE: You must have your own transportation because this position has moved offsite to our Animal Care Center in Quincy, MA.

How to Apply

For more information, or to apply now, you must go to the website below. Please DO NOT email your resume to us as we only accept applications through our website. https://www.applicantpro.com/j/890860-125615

New England Aquarium – Interns
Boston, MA 02110

 

 

 

  1. Trainer I – Marine Mammals

Take your career to new depths and put your skills to work in a one of a kind setting by becoming a part of the premiere aquarium showcasing the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea. The Texas State Aquarium provides high quality, entertaining programming through education, conservation, and wildlife rehabilitation. We strive to provide our guests with an exciting, educational, and memorable experience.

The Trainer I for the Marine Mammal department will provide quality care and training for all marine mammal areas.

Other duties include but are not limited to:

  • Participate in the primary care and training of the marine mammal collection.
  • Maintain marine mammal exhibit.
  • Participates in all areas of marine mammal husbandry and programming.
  • Participate in behavioral enrichment.
  • Prepare food and feed according to established procedures.
  • Participate in primary care and training of Otters.
  • Observe animal behavior and report unusual/abnormal behavior to supervisor.
  • Assist Veterinarian during routine animal husbandry.
  • Maintain all feeding, behavior, training and medical records.
  • Enter data into TRACKS.
  • Clean, maintain, and store utensils and equipment used to feed and care for animals.
  • Assess water chemistry/temperatures and report anything unusual to supervisors.
  • May plan and direct the work of interns and volunteers in primary areas of responsibility.
  • Enter exhibits by use of SCUBA equipment to clean exhibitry, provide animal care, and/or feed.
  • Provide assistance on research projects related to animal behavior, animal nutrition, animal physiology, and water chemistry.
  • Contribute to the maintenance and cleanliness of the Dolphin Bay wet area.vvvvvv

Experience Required

Bachelor’s degree in biology, psychology, or related field from a four year college or university is required with a minimum of one year professional experience in Cetacean husbandry and training. An equivalent combination of education and experience that would likely produce the required knowledge skills and abilities may be considered. An Open Water SCUBA certification is required for consideration.

Perks

This position offers an attractive benefits/vacation package including a 100% employer paid health plan, dental, vision, disability, life insurance, and 403(b) retirement plan with a 100% match of the first 5% contributed.

How to Apply

Please apply online at https://discover.texasstateaquarium.org/careers/ Any applications submitted through AZA will not be reviewed.

Texas State Aquarium
2710 N Shoreline Blvd.
Corpus Christi, TX 78402
Phone: 361-881-1200
Fax: 361-881-1235

Marine mammal department internship Winter/Spring 2019

The marine mammal department at the Shedd Aquarium is comprised of 4 animal teams.  Three of these teams focus on birds and marine mammals, and 1 focuses on our interactive programming animals. The interns support the daily operations of the department. We offer 2 exciting internship opportunities, one focused on marine mammals and one focused on animal ambassador programming. Marine mammal interns help care for Pacific white-sided dolphins, beluga whales, northern and southern sea otters, California sea lions, three species of birds of prey, and rockhopper and Magellanic penguins.  The ambassador animal program intern(s) will work with various species including bird, reptile, invertebrates, and terrestrial mammals.  These internship experiences are designed to be a career learning experience—offering exposure to animal husbandry, positive reinforcement training, animal behavior and the chance to complete an individual observational or research project. Interns master food prep, record keeping and the basics of caring for and feeding animals.  Interns have opportunities to exercise leadership and communication skills and join a network of professionals caring for animals in Chicago and across the country.

 

Experience Required

  • Three 6-month terms each year, with new terms beginning early January, mid-May and early September of each year. See application form for specific submission deadlines. • Marine mammal interns work three 11-hour days per week, including one or both weekend days. • Ambassador animal program intern works four 8 hour days per week, including one or both weekend days. • Attendance at three evening seminars is encouraged but not required.

Further Comments

Responsibilities include: • Cleaning: A significant portion of time is spent maintaining a clean and healthy environment for the animals. This includes thorough cleaning and disinfection of animal habitats and reserve spaces, kitchens and food prep areas and animal dishes. • Food preparation: All interns spend a few hours each shift helping to prepare diets for all the animals. This includes thawing, inspecting, weighing, and cutting various food types as well as formula preparation and vitamin administration. Animal ambassador program intern will also prepare live feeder insects. • Recordkeeping: Interns assist in daily record keeping, helping to document diets consumed, cleaning chores, behavioral observations, session notes and enrichment details. • Special project: After mastering the basic chores of the department, each intern is assigned a special project to complete throughout the internship. A portion of time each day is allocated to the project and interns present their findings via power point slides at the end of the term. Projects may be focused on animal enrichment, animal behavior or data analysis, based on the current needs of the department. • Marine mammal intern will help assist in sessions and shows: Interns perform a variety of tasks during animal training sessions and shows, including operating manual and hydraulic doors, setting up and breaking down equipment for public presentations, managing guests, and assisting alongside trainers during animal training sessions. • Animal ambassador program intern will help assist in public presentations: Interns will assist in public encounters. This will include managing crowds, answering questions and handling small animals in front of a group of guests. Qualifications required: • Must currently be in a degree program or have graduated from one. Preference is given to those who are or have studied marine science, psychology, animal care or a related field. • Must be willing to support Shedd’s mission and represent the organization well to all guests. • Applicant must be committed to high quality work and able to follow directions to maintain high standards of care and cleanliness. • Desirable characteristics include: strong work ethic, positive attitude, and genuine curiosity about animal care and training. • Applicants must be able to work well independently and with a team. • Successful applicants are able to communicate openly and professionally, willing to ask questions and collaborate towards solutions. • Applicants must be able to regularly work all weekend days and holidays as well as late-night shifts when assigned. • Ability to lift objects in excess of 40 pounds as well as bend, crouch, squat and carry heavy buckets as needed. • Interns will be exposed to very cold temperatures and to salt water on a daily basis. • A commitment of 24 weeks, 33 hours per week is required.

Salary

Unpaid

How to Apply

Completed and signed application. • Resume indicating education and employment experiences. • Cover letter explaining career goals and reasons for interest in an internship with our program. • Letters of reference from at least three individuals who can vouch for your character and work ethic. Letters may be included in the application packet, mailed to Madelynn Hettiger at the address below or emailed directly to mantonio@sheddaquarium.org. To be considered for the Marine Mammals Internship, please send completed application packet to: John G. Shedd Aquarium Attn: Madelynn Hettiger Marine Mammals Department 1200 South Lake Shore Drive Chicago, IL 60605 Your packet may also be emailed to mantonio@sheddaquarium.org. Letters of recommendation may be mailed or emailed directly to Madelynn Hettiger at mantonio@sheddaquarium.org or may be included with the application packet. https://www.sheddaquarium.org/About-Us/Jobs-Internships-and-Volunteering/Internships/Marine-Mammals-Internship/

John G. Shedd Aquarium
1200 S. Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, IL 60605

 

 

Marine Mammal Training and Enrichment Internship

Marine Mammal Training and Enrichment Internship – Spring 2019

Reports to:      Curator of Behavior Husbandry

Schedule:        5 days per week, 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM

January-May 2019

Application deadline: October 15, 2018

Internship Overview:

This internship is designed for college students or recent graduates interested in pursuing a career in animal training or animal behavior.  Interns will work directly with the Curator of Behavioral Husbandry and animal keepers to learn the principles of animal training and enrichment through practical application, research and hands-on work with the animals.  This internship will focus on seal training and polar bear enrichment. The intern will participate in animal training sessions and schedule, implement and evaluate daily polar bear enrichment.  The intern will also conduct behavioral research to monitor polar bear behavior and evaluate the effectiveness of enrichment.

This internship is unpaid and housing is not provided.

 

Requirements:

Junior or Senior in college or recent graduate with a major in Biology, Animal Behavior, Psychology, Zoology or other related field

Strong willingness to learn, positive attitude, and team mentality

Previous hands-on work with animals

Proficiency in Microsoft Excel preferred

Throughout this internship the intern will:

Develop, coordinate and implement daily enrichment for polar bears

Prepare seal diets and participate in daily feeding/training sessions

Develop enrichment schedules for several species

Construct and implement enrichment items for various species

Conduct behavioral observations

Data entry and analysis

To apply please email a cover letter, resume and 3 references to:

Beth Posta

Curator of Behavioral Husbandry

The Toledo Zoo

Beth.Posta@toledozoo.org

419-385-5721 ext. 2051

How to Apply

Beth.Posta@toledozoo.org

The Toledo Zoo
2700 Broadway
Toledo , OH 43609

 

Argus

Argus – California Sea Lion
Rescued: October 4, 2017
Released: October 25, 2017
Diagnosis: Leptospirosis

California sea lion Argus was rescued just a few miles from The Marine Mammal Center near a busy marina. Our veterinary experts determined that he was suffering from leptospirosis, a bacterial infection of the kidneys. Argus was one of several dozen California sea lions we treated for leptospirosis in 2017. Treatment for the potentially lethal infection includes antibiotics, fluids and other supportive care, such as gastro-protectants for stomach and intestinal ulcers. Once Argus had recovered fully from the disease, he was released back to the wild just steps from our hospital.