Via dolphin mentoring

After so many years training dolphins, some time ago during a training session, I stood up and looked around thought if only I could create a program to make a session easier, for the animals and for the trainers.

I thought that showing people how I used Operant Condition (positive reinforcement) would be a good opportunity to create a program much easier to understand and less complicated for all trainers. This would also ensure fair treatment of the animals by less experienced trainers, who could then use positive training techniques to achieve quicker results.

I realised that the process of learning so many techniques could be daunting for students, but with my help in explaining how they can build, using small steps at time, they will be successful. Many students don’t make it, due lack of patience, frustration, uncertainty, but with my mentoring program they will be more relaxed and be able to glide through my trainer’s training process.

As we already know the fittest, strongest animal is the one leading!!

A new trainer’s program would not be complete without noting the importance of them having a healthy life style to ensure they were fit enough to keep up with their demanding career.

My personal trainer has linked with Via Dolphin and has devised dietary information to assist trainers in getting all the nutrients they need, workout advise for optimum results, so they can keep healthy and strong and even suggested supplements that can assist with a healthy balanced diet.

We have launched a Trainers Fitness program to ease a trainers hectic daily life style.

 

For more information visit our FaceBook page @

https://www.facebook.com/viadolphinmentoring/?modal=admin_todo_tour

 

 

Scientists Record Conversations of Mysterious Dolphin

The rare Araguaian river dolphin is a mysterious creature native to Brazil which researchers have long thought to be solitary. Because of this assumption, it was believed that the animals would not be capable of complex communication, given that their social structure does not require it.

But now scientists from the University of Vermont have discovered that the dolphins do interact with one another and can make hundreds of different sounds for the purposes of communication, according to a study published in the journal PeerJ.

 

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“We found that they do interact socially and are making more sounds than previously thought,” Laura May Collado, a biologist at the University of Vermont, said in a statement. “Their vocal repertoire is very diverse.”

Little is known about the Araguaian dolphins, also known as botos, because they are hard to find—as well as being difficult to approach—thus studies about them are limited. They only live in the waters of the Araguaia and Tocatins rivers and their numbers likely do not exceed more than one and a half thousand in total.

Fortunately, the research team was able to find a fish market in the town of Mocajuba where the dolphins often visit because people give them food.

Here, the team used underwater cameras and microphones to record the sounds and interactions between the dolphins at the market. In addition, they also took some DNA samples from the animals.

Gallery: The Most Fascinating Facts About Dolphins (Redbook)

Overall, they captured around 20 hours of recordings, identifying 237 different types of sounds. But even with nearly an entire day of material, the team speculate that the dolphins can produce more sounds than they recorded. Many of the sounds were short, two-part calls, which baby dolphins made when approaching their mothers.

“It’s exciting; marine dolphins like the bottlenose use signature whistles for contact, and here we have a different sound used by river dolphins for the same purpose,” Collado said.

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The scientists also recorded the dolphins making longer calls and whistles, but these were not so frequent, and it is currently unclear what their purpose is. In bottlenose dolphin communication, longer whistles are used to boost group cohesion. But the researchers think the botos may use them for the opposite reason—to maintain distance.

The team say that the frequency of the river dolphin calls were somewhere between the low-frequency sounds made by baleen whales to communicate over long distances and the high-frequency calls used by marine dolphins over short distances. Collado suggests that the acoustic characteristics of their calls were likely influenced by the river environment that they live in.

“There are a lot of obstacles like flooded forests and vegetation in their habitat, so this signal could have evolved to avoid echoes from vegetation and improve the communication range of mothers and their calves,” she said.

The Araguaian dolphins were only identified as a distinct species in 2014, differentiating them from their close relatives—the Bolivian river dolphin and the Amazon river dolphin. While the classification of Araguaian botos is still up for debate, Collado notes that calls between the species show significant differences—Ecuadorean Amazon river dolphins are very quiet, for example.

“We need more information on these other species and more populations,” she said. “Why is one population chattier than others and how do these differences shape their social structure?”

Reported by newsweek

New Experience Opportunity

 

Marine Internships – Work With Dolphins in Zanzibar

AdCollect Conservation Data on Dolphins & Other Marine Life. Enquire Today & Discover Tropical.

 

Zanzibar, off the coast of Tanzania, is a beautiful tropical island and tourist hot-spot due to its stunning beaches, turquoise waters and vibrant history. Ticking swimming with dolphins off the bucket list is also why many venture to this exotic paradise. Yet, prominent research shows the harmful effects of mismanaged interactions and this form of tourism on marine mammals. The answer is never simple – considering the local community’s reliance on this income – but, as part of this Marine Eco Tourism Internship abroad you will become part of a positive solution.

Throughout your placement, you’ll help to create responsible ecotourism practices, connecting a passion for nature, conservation and entrepreneurship with high calibre data collection for university-led research studies.

THIS MARINE ECO-TOURISM INTERNSHIP, YOU WILL:

  • Work with tourism operators in the area to determine the impact of current practices on the marine biodiversity in the area and assess the long-term benefit of sustainable ecotourism
  • By boat, collect daily data on dolphins and other marine life, including the significant influence of tourism on their natural behavior
  • Build on local capacity by delivering collaborative workshops that encourage the community of tourism boat drivers to create more sustainable practices
  • Assist in delivering a change to tourism practices in the private sector, developing small enterprises and high-quality programs to ensure the longevity – and conservation – of the ocean’s natural resources
  • Attend monthly meetings with our research partners from the Institute of Marine Sciences (University of Dar es Salaam) to discuss project development, research studies and alignment
  • Live and work on one of the most stunning tropical islands in the world
  • Be immersed in the vibrant and colorful fishing villages of Jambiani and Kizimkazi
  • Be supported throughout by our team of 3 personal mentors, giving you context and tools to use throughout your future career

 

https://www.africanimpact.com

 

Educational-California sea lions

Every four to five years, The Marine Mammal Center sees a surge in the number of California sea lions that are admitted with symptoms of leptospirosis, a bacterial infection that affects the kidneys and can be lethal. If not treated, the bacteria can cause irreversible kidney damage.

The Marine Mammal Center is currently responding to the second largest leptospirosis outbreak on record in California sea lions. Read more about the current outbreak. For media inquiries, please email media@tmmc.org.

Leptospirosis is caused by a spiral-shaped bacteria called Leptospira. Veterinarians can usually identify leptospirosis in a patient even before laboratory tests confirm a diagnosis because of the infection’s distinctive symptoms in California sea lions, which include drinking water and folding the flippers over the abdomen.

Marine mammals generally do not need to drink water because they receive all the hydration they need from food sources. But when they are infected with the Leptospira , their kidneys stop functioning properly and cannot filter toxins or regulate hydration.

Sea lions diagnosed with leptospirosis are treated with antibiotics, fluids and other supportive care, such as gastroprotectants for stomach and intestinal ulcers. Unfortunately, even with treatment, roughly two-thirds of the animals that strand with acute leptospirosis do not survive.

However, research using data and samples collected at The Marine Mammal Center, as well as data collected from sea lions in the wild, indicate that many sea lions infected with Leptospira survive and likely experience mild or no symptoms of the disease, unlike the acute cases seen at our hospital.

Leptospirosis is a major health burden for humans, domestic animals and wildlife worldwide with over 500,000 severe cases in humans every year. Leptospira can cause disease ranging from infection with no symptoms to severe and possibly fatal disease.

The type of Leptospira affecting California sea lions at The Marine Mammal Center is a strain that has also been associated with pigs, skunks and foxes. It’s transmitted via urine, either directly or via contaminated water or soil.

Researchers haven’t definitively determined how transmission occurs within the sea lion population, but they believe it occurs primarily while sea lions are hauled out on land. The bacteria may also survive for short periods in seawater, so transmission may be possible when large groups of sea lions gather in the water.

When a leptospirosis outbreak occurs, our scientists study the disease to learn more about what causes an outbreak and how we can improve treatment for infected animals. Thanks to the Center’s 43 years of stranding records and bank of blood and urine samples, researchers have a unique opportunity to investigate the disease patterns over four decades.

The graph above shows the seasonal nature of these outbreaks, reflected in large numbers of California sea lions stranding and being treated at the Center for clinical signs of kidney failure. © The Marine Mammal Center
For over 10 years, scientists at The Marine Mammal Center have collaborated with researchers at the Lloyd-Smith Laboratory in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at UCLA to study the dynamics of this pathogen in the California sea lion population. The Center has been on the forefront of research on leptospirosis in marine mammals and has published a number of scientific papers on the disease dating back to 1985.

Leptospira was first detected in California sea lions in 1970 during a leptospirosis outbreak that occurred along the coast of California, Oregon and Washington. And since the 1980s we have seen yearly, seasonal outbreaks with major outbreak events causing 100 or more sea lion strandings happening every four to five years.

The reasons for these periodic major outbreaks in sea lions is unknown, however our UCLA collaborators believe that a combination of factors may be responsible, such as changes in herd immunity, sea surface temperatures and sea lion migration patterns.

Interestingly, after 30 uninterrupted years of seeing at least a few cases of leptospirosis annually, the disease disappeared from the population in late 2013 only to reappear four years later. Researchers at UCLA believe the disappearance of the disease may be related to the highly anomalous oceanographic conditions that occurred during the same time period. The abnormally warm waters, commonly referred to as “the Blob,” may have caused changes in sea lion behavior and migration patterns as they struggled to find food sources.

Since 2009, the Center’s biologists and veterinary staff have taken blood and urine samples from wild juvenile California sea lions at popular haul-out spots in the San Francisco and Monterey Bay areas. These animals are then tagged and released, and the urine and blood samples help researchers learn more about kidney function and exposure rates among these animals.

This collaborative research project also relies on long-term demographic datasets generated by our partners at the NOAA Fisheries Marine Mammal Laboratory. These biologists monitor and track pups born on the Channel Islands every year. We also work closely with biologists in Oregon and Washington who monitor the sea lions in those areas.

Many different animal species, including humans and dogs, can become infected with Leptospira through contact with contaminated urine, water or soil. The Marine Mammal Center has a number of safety protocols in place to prevent transmission to veterinarians and volunteers working with our sea lion patients.

 

 

Source: https://viadolphin.com/research-information/

 

Self-Development – Independent Learning

SELF-DEVELOPMENT – INDEPENDENT LEARNING
Have you ever started to work in a Dolphinarium and seen others busy moving around doing different tasks and you don’t have any idea of what you should or could be doing?
How many times have wanted to learn or be given the opportunity to work hands on with the animals, but because of your lack experience you have been placed at the back of the line, waiting for your time to come?
When new staff start working in a Dolphinarium they must wait until management decides who they choose to work directly with the animals…and you could just be waiting and waiting.
What if I tell you, you can learn everything you need to know, even before you step into a Dolphinarium!
Imagine going straight in with the confidence and understanding, getting familiar with everything you need to know, including the training jargon trainers use to communicate with each other.
You don’t have to wait until someone teaches you the basics of what trainers are doing at any given time, or know what they need to do next.
Now you don’t have to wait or risk limited training you may access anywhere else.
With our self-educating courses, you can be a step ahead and be able to develop to your fullest potential.
You now can learn step by step what they may not teach you on the job or on the internet… the secrets, tricks and different techniques of marine mammal training.
For more information contact

viadolphin@hotmail.co.uk

 

Endocrine disruptions found in bottle nose dolphins

Bottlenose dolphins are being exposed to chemical compounds added to many common cleaning products, cosmetics, personal care products and plastics, according to a new study in GeoHealth, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

The new research found evidence of exposure to these chemical compounds, called phthalates, in 71 percent of dolphins tested in Sarasota Bay, Florida during 2016 and 2017. Previous studies detected phthalate metabolites in the blubber or skin of a few individual marine mammals, but the new study is the first to document the additives in the urine of wild marine mammals.

Some phthalates have been linked to hormonal, metabolic and reproductive problems in humans, including low sperm count and abnormal development of reproductive organs. The study’s authors do not know what health impacts phthalate compounds may have on dolphins, but the presence of byproducts of the chemicals in the animals’ urine indicates they have remained in the body long enough to process them.

“We focused on urine in dolphins because, in previous studies of humans, that has been the most reliable matrix to indicate short-term exposure.” said Leslie Hart, a public health professor at the College of Charleston and the lead author of the new study.

Studies have linked human exposure to phthalates with use of products containing these additives, such as personal care products and cosmetics, but Hart said the source of dolphin exposure to phthalates is not yet known. Elevated concentrations in dolphin urine of a specific phthalate compound most commonly added to plastics hinted at plastic waste as a possible source of exposure for the dolphins, she said.

“These chemicals can enter marine waters from urban runoff and agricultural or industrial emissions, but we also know that there is a lot of plastic pollution in the environment” said Hart.

Understanding exposure in dolphins gives scientists insight into the contaminants in local waters and what other animals, including humans, are being exposed to, according to the study’s authors.

Gina Ylitalo, an analytical chemist at NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center who was not involved in the study, said dolphins are good indicators of what is going on in coastal waters.

“Any animals in the near shore environment with similar prey are probably being exposed as well,” she said. “The dolphins are great sentinels of the marine environment.”

Ubiquitous contaminants

Phthalate compounds are added to a wide variety of products to confer flexibility, durability, and lubrication. Some phthalates interfere with body systems designed to receive messages from hormones such as estrogen and testosterone. This can disrupt natural responses to these hormone signals.

Tests for phthalate exposure look for metabolites of the compounds, the products of initial breakdown of the compounds by the liver.

“We are looking for metabolites. These are indicators that the dolphins have been exposed somewhere in their environment and that the body has started to process them,” Hart said.

About 160 dolphins live in Sarasota Bay, a subtropical coastal lagoon tucked between barrier islands and the cities of Sarasota and Bradenton on the southwest coast of Florida. The Chicago Zoological Society’s Sarasota Dolphin Research Program has tracked individual dolphins since 1970, monitoring their health, behavior, and exposure to contaminants. The dolphins are residents of the area year-round, across multiple decades, with individuals living up to 67 years.

In 2016 and 2017, Hart and her colleagues tested the urine of 17 wild dolphins in and around Sarasota Bay for nine phthalates. They found phthalate metabolites in the urine of 71 percent of the dolphins tested.

Hart compared the dolphin data to human data from the CDC’s National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), which includes information about behavior and diet as well as blood and urine samples from a large cross section of the U.S. population. She found concentrations of one type of phthalate metabolite, monoethyl phthalate (MEP), were much lower in dolphins than in the human population surveyed by NHANES, but concentrations of another type of phthalate metabolite, mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), were equivalent or higher to the levels found in humans.

“If you look at the primary uses of the parent compounds, MEP’s parent is commonly used in cosmetics and personal care products including shampoos and body wash, whereas MEHP is a metabolite of a compound commonly added to plastic,” Hart said.

Indicator species

Understanding what dolphins are exposed to gives researchers and the public a better idea of what is in the environment.

The study is particularly valuable because of the long-term data available on the Sarasota dolphins’ health and behavior, said Ylitalo. Bottlenose dolphins are good indicators of pollutant exposure in whales and dolphins that can’t be easily sampled.

“We will not be getting urine samples from killer whales in my neck of the woods,” Ylitalo said. “They don’t know what the health effects are yet, but if any group can do it, it will be these type of folks who start teasing it out.”

Documenting exposure was an important first step, Hart said. She wants to expand the sample size to continue investigating the extent and potential health impacts of exposure and start tracking down possible sources. Ultimately, she hopes this research could be used to help curtail the sources of contamination.

“We’ve introduced these chemicals, they are not natural toxins, and we have the ability to reverse it, to clean this up.” Hart said.

 

source

www.sciencedaily.com

The secret of dolphins’ speed is not skin-deep, study shows

 

Does dolphin skin have secret powers that allow the flippered mammals to outrace boats? Scientists looking to answer this question have found that dolphins achieve impressive swimming speeds based on muscle power alone.

The findings, published in the Journal of Experimental Biology, solve a longtime mystery on the nature of dolphin propulsion.

Researchers have wondered how dolphins manage to swim so fast at least since the 1930s, when British zoologist James Gray marveled at reports of one dolphin’s apparent speed as it outraced a boat. Gray calculated that the dolphins simply didn’t have the muscle power to swim that fast; they must somehow use a trick of fluid mechanics to overcome the drag that would hold them back. This observation became known as Gray’s paradox.

The answer to Gray’s paradox was thought to lie in dolphins’ smooth skin. Could it manipulate water flow to reduce drag and improve speed? (It’s a reasonable idea – after all, speedy mako sharks have skin covered in tiny toothlike scales that help them make hairpin turns by controlling flow separation.)

The lure of such potential drag reduction spawned a host of research, said lead author Frank Fish, a biomechanist at West Chester University in Pennsylvania. This was particularly true in the 1960s during the Cold War, when both Russia and the U.S. coveted the dolphin’s supposed secrets.

“Cold war paranoia afflicted both Pentagon and Kremlin in the form of wildly exaggerated estimates of the speeds of each other’s submarines,” Duke University biomechanist Steven Vogel wrote in the book “Comparative Biomechanics: Life’s Physical World.”

Researchers tried to pick apart the secrets of dolphin skin in a number of ways, wrapping rubbery artificial skin around test torpedoes and even dragging naked young women (or “nekkid leddies,” as referenced here) through the water to see how their skin responded to the drag. (Women have more fatty tissue under their skin than men do, which gives their skin more “dolphin-like” properties, Fish said.)

Nowadays, to watch how animals affect the flows around them as they move through water, researchers often fill a water tank with 10-micron-wide glass beads and shoot a laser sheet through the water to illuminate the beads and watch how the animals’ movement affects the beads and thus disturbs the flow.

You can do this with jellyfish, not so much with dolphins, Fish said – there are concerns about what would happen if the laser hit them in the eye or if they ingested the beads.

“It’s one thing to work with a fish, it’s another thing to work with a dolphin – we tend to protect them,” Fish said. “Dolphins are very pampered animals, when we keep them.”

Luckily, Fish said, engineer Timothy Wei of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln had been working with other “pampered animals” – Olympic swimmers – and had come up with an ingenious and low-cost solution to track them as they swam.

Instead of using glass beads, Wei used air bubbles. Here’s how: They got a garden soaker hose that’s typically used to water lawns and pumped air through it from an oxygen tank. The tiny bubbles that came out of the hose’s pores created a sheet of bubbles that, when illuminated by sunlight, could act just like the reflective glass beads in the laser sheet.

The scientists had Primo and Puka, two retired Navy dolphins, swim along the length of the bubble wall. After watching the patterns created in the bubbles, the scientists realized that the bottlenose dolphins were producing an incredible amount of power – enough to overcome the enormous drag they were experiencing.

So the answer to Gray’s paradox? There was no paradox, Fish concluded.

“First off, we can stop looking for a magic mechanism to reduce drag,” Fish said. “There may be ways to reduce drag, but the dolphin [skin] isn’t going to show us those.”

In any case, he added, “it basically starts to tell us things about how well designed these aquatic athletes are.”

It could mean that flippered robots could theoretically be an alternative to the propeller-driven kind, said Fish, who said he’s currently working on creating a manta ray robot.

In the meantime, the bubble method of tracking animals’ flow patterns might be useful in testing larger animals in the open ocean – it’s certainly more portable than the laser-and-beads method, Fish said.

By BY AMINA KHAN